Remembering Toys I once had

There are a lot of toys I could talk about – Tomy Train, Playmobil and Lego are a few but let’s face it, you all probably remember those as well as I do. Today I’d like to take a look at a few that I remember that you may well not.

Spitballs

Around 1990 and in the middle of a very hot summer, 6 year old me was taken to the St Alban’s Tesco. We were lucky, our store was the forefront of supermarkets as we know them now with clothes, toys, and of course food which meant for me, I’d likely be able to get a treat of some sort for suffering through a food shopping trip,

My brother and I had pack number 1 (as per the image above), he kept the ‘cool dude’ face whilst I got the skull. They were simple toys, a rubber ball with a small hole in allowing you to fill it with water and then force out watery death to anyone you wanted. We went straight back to the shop garden (we own a shop, I should probably mention that rather than you imagine Tesco also having a garden), got a bucket of water each and spent the afternoon squirting each other.

Tamagoras Egg Monsters

I have no idea where this next toy came from but I used to love carrying it around with me. Tamagora Transformers were made by Bandai in or around 1987, packaged as an egg waiting to be transformed.

I had the skeleton but it must not have been until the early 90s I received it (for in 1987 I would have been three years old and hell, I’d have probably choked on it). It didn’t do much but I used to love playing with it, folding it over and over again.

Water Rocket

I have always loved all things space. Stars, Planets and most of all rockets, it’s hard not to get excited when you see millions of pounds of thrust blast something in to space. Before Richard got me hooked on Estes (actual rockets with actual fire), I had a lowly water rocket. It might not have got to particularly dizzying heights but it was good fun anyway.

The design was simple, fill the rocket half full of water before locking it on to the pump. A couple of dozen pumps was all you needed to make the rocket erupt in to the sky, showering you with water. Absolutely great fun and a real risk to your vision if you were stupid enough to look directly at the rockets nose as you pumped (I’m sure some kid probably did this).

Lucky Troll

Trolls were huge in the 90s (yes, I know they are somehow making a come back) and even I had one. My best friend of the time, Michael, had bought me one after a summer holiday and it very quickly became a regular pocket friend.

It’s interesting looking back at how many toys I did used to smuggle places. Obviously, school banned toys of any sort but things like this used to hide in my trouser pocket or my bag. They were never shared with my friends but instead, checked on by me on trips to the loo or at play times.

Crystal Radio

Christmas 1994 saw me receive two kits to build from my Uncle and Aunt, I was so excited to have what was deemed ‘amateur electronics’. I had spent most of my junior school life dismantling things to work out how they worked, the kits allowed me to build something that might actually work. Mind blowing.

The doorbell kit was crap, I never got in to it and it sat half assembled for months before it disappeared (binned most likely). The other kit was for a Crystal Radio and after much reading and building, I had it functioning and it blew me away. There I was with my dodgy, mono ear piece in listening to whatever radio station I could get the best signal from.

I used to bring this to school on very wet days where my friends and I would crowd around the door, looking at the rain whilst trying to find something to listen to.

WeekendLollygagger

Originator of Weekend Lollygagger and second part of Video Game Basement, Tom is a big geek at heart. Happily doing random things left right and center allows the world to view his insanity in all it's technicolor glory.

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